Category Archives: Advisory

Prevent family violence

Changing times and shifting lifestyles lead to confusion and uncertainty in many families. This can lead to abuse of children and wives.

Family violence is a crime. It can be psychological or physical abuse of any family member, and ranges from insulting, threatening, yelling, grabbing, biting, hitting, punching, kicking to raping or even killing.

Image by Ulrike Mai from Pixabay

Some people are unable to discipline their children in a loving way. Because of a lack of knowledge and self-control, they abuse the child. Sometimes they repeat the bad experiences they had as children. Afterwards, they generally do not feel good about it. This damages their self-esteem – even their pride – and destroys the parent-child relationship.

Violence on children may result in lack of trust, permanent physical or mental damage to them, suicide attempts, and even death.

Wives may be abused by their husbands and vice versa. This can start with a small argument and end in a beating causing serious physical and emotional damage and possible marriage breakdown.

How do you avoid violence in your family?

  • Talk about your disagreements with a family member. And listen.
  • At all times, practice self-control
  • Always think positively. Think of your love for your family. They are part of you – your own flesh and blood.
  • If you cannot control your temper, seek the help of other people such as your own parents, relatives, or close friends. Otherwise, seek professional help.
  • If your feel angry, lonely, inadequate, resentful and disappointed, remember that other people also feel these things. Try not to resort to violence.
  • You can form group-therapy sessions if you want to change your behavior, such as group meetings of parents.
  • Do not be ashamed to seek advice from other family members and close friends.
  • Show love and respect to everyone in the family.
 
Source: Things Adults Can Do To Stay Healthy. World Health Organization

DENGUE Alert Status (How to protect yourself against Dengue)

The Department of Health once again reminded the public to protect themselves against the deadly dengue-carrying mosquito as it declare Dengue Alert Status in selected regions in the country. This is in response to the rapidly increasing number of cases observed in the Philippines.

Here’s a list of simple tips to protect yourself against dengue and dengue fever.

The 4S.

1. Search & Destroy breeding sites

2. Self-protection measure

3. Seek early consultation

4. Support fogging for impending outbreaks

#DengueAlert #MagingAlerto

Myths and Realities in Disaster Situations

Sharing an informative snippets from the World Health Organization about Emergency Humanitarian Assistance (myth versus reality). This was originally shared and posted from my other blog – www.mumkhal.com.

Myth # 1:

Foreign medical volunteers with any kind of medical background are needed.

Reality:

The local almost always covers immediate lifesaving needs. Only medical personnel with skills that are not available in the affected country may be needed.

Myth # 2:

Any kind of international assistance is needed and it’s needed now!

Reality:

A hasty response that is not based on an impartial evaluation only contributes to the chaos. It is better to wait until genuine needs have been assessed.

Myth # 3:

Epidemics and plagues are inevitable after every disaster.

Reality:

Epidemics do no spontaneously occur after a disaster and dead bodies will not lead to catastrophic outbreaks of exotic diseases. The key to preventing disease is to improve sanitary conditions and educate the public.

Myth # 4:

Disasters bring out the worst in human behaviour.

Reality:

Although isolated cases of antisocial behaviour exists, the majority of people respond spontaneously and generously.

Myth # 5:

The affected population is too shocked and helpless to take responsibility for their own survival.

Reality:

On the contrary, many find new strength during an emergency, as evidenced by the thousands of volunteers who flock to the disaster site, looking for ways to help.

Myth # 6:

Disasters are random killers.

Reality:

Disasters strike hardest at the most vulnerable group, the poor – especially women, children and the elderly.

Myth # 7:

Locating disaster victims in temporary settlement is the best alternative.

Reality:

It should be the last alternative. Many agencies use funds normally spent for tents to purchase building materials, tools, and other construction-related support in the affected country.

Myth # 8:

Things are back to normal within a few weeks.

Reality:

The effects of a disaster last a long time. Disaster-affected countries deplete much of their financial and material resources in the immediate post-impact phase. Successful relief programs gear their operations to the fact that international interest wanes as needs and shortages become more pressing.

Source: Emergency Humanitarian Assistance, World Health Organization, Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Action, Preparedness, Collaboration Fact Sheets. Manila: WHO-WPRO. 2005.