Tag Archives: family

The Birth Injury Guide for Parents

Childbirth is supposed to be a joyful event for the family. A would-be mom does everything she can to take care of her unborn child. But, what if an unforeseen incident happened to her precious baby before or during childbirth? Childbirth defects or injury is a trauma no parents would want to experience. 

Fortunately, there is a comprehensive birth injury guide for families coping with birth injuries and defects. 

The Birth Injury Guide website, staffed by an advocacy group, works with professional writers and researchers, health care providers, lawyers, and other birth injury experts to provide the most comprehensive birth injury information source available.

The website is easy to navigate. You can search the types of birth injuries, symptoms and causes, the distinction between natural defect and birth injury, and if the child with birth injury will get better. All these questions are answered and explained on the Frequently Asked Question page.  

The Birth Injury Guide estimates that around 28,000 babies in the United States are born each year with a birth injury. Unfortunately, many of these injuries are the result of negligence by health care providers. 

Photo by Solen Feyissa on Unsplash

The usual birth injuries include umbilical cord prolapse, birth trauma, C-section injuries, drug-related negligence, and epidural birth injuries. The website listed the treatment for a specific condition.

When the parents intend to pursue a case against a medical provider for allegedly inflicting the birth injury to their child, the Birth Injury Guide will provide legal assistance to help them get the justice they deserve.

The website clarifies that they are not trying to replace the information provided by medical and legal experts. They hope to provide readers with accurate information about birth injury. 

If you are a parent coping with a child with a birth injury, the Birth Injury Guide will lead you to support groups to help you deal with the situation. The support groups will direct you to a network of families who have experienced a similar event. 

Check on their website to know more about their advocacy. If you need assistance for a free case review, you can fill out a form or call toll-free at 877-415-6603.

Reminiscing

I couldn’t believe I wrote this seven years ago. My daughter successfully graduated from college and is already working:

I accompanied my daughter to school for the freshman orientation yesterday. I was thankful that the school allowed parents to enter the auditorium and listen to the orientation. The event was well-organized and concluded on time. The resource persons have explained well the mission and vision of the school. Important things new students need to know were presented through an audio-visual presentation. The students seem excited about the co curricular activities they can participate in besides the activities in their academic program. And just before the program ended, one of the speakers advised the students that in order for them to be successful in their studies, they need a lot of hard work and prayers.

The First Wave of Filipino Migration to Hawaii

I feel a little nostalgic today, so I’m reposting one of my old blog entries about my great-granddad. I found out that my great-grandfather, Julio Lauriaga, was part of the first wave of Filipino immigrants to Hawaii.

I found a Facebook page in 2015, (unfortunately it was no longer available) that helps one find his relatives who may have worked in Hawaii in the 1900s.

My grandmother, Dolores Lauriaga Lavadia (1916-2000). She was Julio Lauriaga’s second child.

According to stories, my maternal great-grandfather, who originated from San Miguel, Bulacan, was a stowaway. He reportedly boarded a ship bound for Hawaii.

He later married a native Hawaiian woman and bore four children.

My great-grandfather supported his family by working as a supervisor at a vast pineapple plantation.

They said he was a hardworking man. He would supervise the plantation every morning.

My great-grandfather thought he would stay in Hawaii for the better. But he met an accident that left him badly injured.

He decided to go back to the Philippines with his four young children in tow. He died not long after.

There was sketchy information about the real cause of his death and the reason for leaving his wife or ex-wife in Hawaii…

From the said FB page, I found Filipino Worker #102 named Julio Lauriaga – My great-grandfather.

I clicked on the FB link to verify if there are records to prove that my great-grandfather has worked in Hawaii.

I visited the site and searched the old man’s name. His name was on the list indeed..

Side note: My maternal grandmother and her siblings would have qualified for US citizenship if their relatives have successfully located any surviving relatives and documents that could prove they were born in Hawaii between 1910 to 1920.